This website is intended to provide you with news on speed cameras in Somerset and Avon County along with a guidance to avoid speeding and therefore getting caught. There is also a FAQ section for you to make sure that any penalty or summon you would eventually receive is following the proper rules and is therefore fully effective. This site has a pure informative purpose and at no time is suggesting you should be speeding and then try an excuse for getting away with it. Always remember that speed cameras are there for safety reasons. Kill you speed on the road!

Yeovil, Somerset has a problem and the police are on the march. More than 80% of local drivers unabashedly ignore speed limits. Motorists are caught by speed devices on Lyde Road, for example, that illustrate the rising problem. An 8-day study confirmed suspicions. The Somerset County Council is on the attack with a plan to enforce the 30mph speed law. Speed camera vans may be the answer.

Avon and Somerset Police have been using them in other problem areas, and the parish council is on board to safeguard the targeted stretch of road. Shocked by the study, county councilor in charge, Tony Lock, reports that at least seven cars go more than 50mph on the average per day. Lyle Road is of primary concern. Confusion seems to reign about the correct maximum speed: 30 or 40mph (the former limit on one end). Conscious or not, violations are frequent. Lock believes it falls to the police to monitor divers in this area with speed checks. Furthermore, residents can themselves participate in a kind of local “speedwatch”, used elsewhere with success. It is difficult, however, to motive people and an alternative is sought.

Road Safety Targeted by Motorbike Cameras

You can’t overdo road safety when lives are at stake. When something like a plan to use motorcyle cameras comes into play, it is to be lauded. Speeders top 66,000 per year in the area, and the number is mounting. It is not a problem to ignore. Three mounted cameras are proposed as part of a nine-point Police and Crime Plan to benefit the region. They should not only assist in nabbing speeders, but burglars as well. Furthermore, they can help tackle assorted anti-social behavior, domestic and sexual violence, and victims’ rights crimes. The motorbike cameras form a win-win solution from many perspectives.

Sue Mountstevens joins the praise. As Avon and Somerset Police and Crime Commissioner, her opinion is instructive. She believes it is only right that these plans for addressing important local issues should be implemented by police to the benefit of affected residents. “Road safety is something that is continually raised with me and it will now be reflected in all nine local plans.”

According to Mountstevens, the new plans for the coming 12 months are local in orientation and to be customized for the respective authorities. “It is really important to me that residents have a good sense of what the police are doing in their area and how they are going to make our communities even safer.”

The end result is that a new crime plan has been devised for the areas of South Somerset, Taunton Deane, West Somerset, Sedgemoor, and Mendip. Progress will be the product of its inauguration.
Yeovil, Somerset has a problem and the police are on the march. More than 80% of local drivers unabashedly ignore speed limits. Motorists are caught by speed devices on Lyde Road, for example, that illustrate the rising problem. An 8-day study confirmed suspicions. The Somerset County Council is on the attack with a plan to enforce the 30mph speed law. Speed camera vans may be the answer. Avon and Somerset Police have been using them in other problem areas, and the parish council is on board to safeguard the targeted stretch of road.

Shocked by the study, county councilor in charge, Tony Lock, reports that at least seven cars go more than 50mph on the average per day. Lyle Road is of primary concern. Confusion seems to reign about the correct maximum speed: 30 or 40mph (the former limit on one end). Conscious or not, violations are frequent. Lock believes it falls to the police to monitor divers in this area with speed checks. Furthermore, residents can themselves participate in a kind of local “speedwatch”, used elsewhere with success. It is difficult, however, to motive people and an alternative is sought.